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. since hallinan was the godfather for whole new generation to brian and michael and also tony sir who went on to defend among other things the critters commune with their subject it to one police raid after the next. [inaudible] [inaudible] >> that is a good testament to tony. by the way, but as michael giguere is, just about, another great tier of san francisco, a great photographer. some of them are featured in the book. michael has been a longtime photographer for the 49ers going back to the first glory days of joe walsh and montana in c. and then begin again. said thank you, michael. [applause] >> i think we have time for one more. >> i just want to follow up to medical story, michael's companion, the chairman of our board that the haight-ashbury clinic. terence hallinan organized their whole street. i would come home at night and just coming to the university of the haight-ashbury. i've never heard anything like that. it is the first time i got the idea of desegregated health care and we would go over to their office and there is vincent hallinan. and that was also willie brown.
are the national press club for the annual authors night and we are joined now by michael ward and of the new york times. in the game is his most recent book. if you could summarize this for us. >> this took me three years and it's the first comprehensive history of the war and iraq and i think what makes it unique is i incorporate not only the views of the american policymakers but all of the iraqi leadership from maliki, their rivals, their adversaries, the former insurgents, and so i incorporated the iraqi account of what was going on as well as the american account and what is happening on the battlefield and the war in iraq. i try to put all together in one book. >> why you call it to the endgame? >> because i covered the surge and its the endgame of american military involvement and i spent the last third of the book covers the obama administration that hasn't been well covered by the media and i learned a lot from doing this and during the campaign president obama talked about the gold at the end of the war in iraq and we certainly took down the troops but what i discovered in doing the boo
security. stomach michael gordon covered the war for "the new york times" and the endgame is his newest book. this is book tv on c-span2. >>> now from the 2012 miami book fair international, michael talked about his book what money can't buy the morrill in the markets in which he addresses the ethical question is their something wrong with the world in which everything is for sale? this is about 40 minutes. [applause] >> thank you, david, everybody for coming. today i would like to engage all of us in a discussion of the question of the book. it's an easy question to state -- i'm sorry easy to answer what should be the role of money in markets in our society? today there are fewer things that money can't buy. if you are sentenced to a jail term and california just in case that happens to anyone of you, you should know that if you don't like the standard accommodations you can buy a prison cell upgrade. it's true. for how much, do you suppose? how much do you think it costs? $5,000? $90 a night. or if you are a tourist suppose you go to washington, d.c. on the congressional hearing that
, editor at large and michael duffy, executive editor for time magazine, chronicle the relationship of the u.s. presidents in "the presidents club: inside the world's most exclusive fraternity." and kevin phillips recounts what he believes was the most important year of the american revolution which was 1775, a good year for revolutions. for an extended list of links to various publications 2012 notable book selections, visit booktv.org or our facebook page, facebook.com/booktv. >> in 2008 judge robert bork sat down with eugene meyer, president of the federalist society, on booktv's "after words," an hourlong interview program. judge bork discussed a collection of his written works spanning nearly four decades. this interview was taped at judge bork's home in virginia. judge robert bork died on december 19, 2012. >> host: why did you, why did you collect "a time to speak," and is this just a book for lawyers? >> guest: well, i tried to do the articles in one year or because the intercollegiate studies institute approached me and asked me to collect, to make a selection they could pu
gives, editor at large and michael duffy, executive edit
states with michael kazin. >> tonight i am going to us discuss abraham lincoln's role in the crisis of the union, 1860-61. more specifically will talk about however him again rejected any meaningful compromise. the country was gripped by a section of crisis because many southerners feared lincoln and his republican party. it was a north party and proudly so. it did not have a significant seven connection. lincoln was elected without a single lessor although for many of the 15 / states and only four of the border states did he get any popular votes and then nearly a handful. for the first time in the nation's history there will be taking over the executive branch of the national government. the republican party was proudly in northern party, during its brief existence in the mid 1850's damage its rhetoric and assault of the south, and the south major social institution racial slavery. and their determination that is the republicans' determination to well the north into a unit that could win a national election without any southern support, the republicans repeatedly condemned the sou
the supreme court and michael grunwald, new deal: hidden story of changing the obama era along with bob woodward's, the price of politics. i want to ask, did that word were its most recent book at the attention most of his books get? >> my feeling is that it got initial attention but was crowded out by the nature of the new seiko happening so fast. in my mind through a couple of nuggets not reported before, but there was sent that many other ones that emerged after one or two comes to care for the book lost its momentum. i'm sure bob will have been equally subsisted answer on this, too. >> what are you comparing it to? it was not his most commercially successful book. so it thinks are touched on two things. one is the new seiko has so speeded up in the other fact it was the topic. it was about negotiations of the budget, the dead. that's not exactly an exciting second topic for a lot of people. i opposed to his books on maneuvering the bush white house over the war, which i think would have more interest. >> guest: one thing i wanted to bring up this trans gentle to these particular boo
are joined by lock-in -- michael gordon of the new york times. "the endgame" is the most recent book. if you could summarize for us? >> it took three years. the first comprehensive history of the war in iraq and what makes it unique is i incorporate not only american policymakers but all the iraqi leadership from mr. maliki, president talibany, rivals and enemies supply inc. the iraqi account of what was going on and be accountable was happening on the battlefield. i covered the war in iraq for the new york times for the whole conflict. >> why did you call it "the endgame"? >> i covered the surge and is the end game of american military conflict and the last part of the book covers the obama administration. it has not been well covered by the media in terms of what the policy was in iraq. i learned a lot doing it. during the campaign president obama talked a lot about the goals that ended the war in iraq and took out the troops. what i discovered in doing the book is the administration's own policy objectives in iraq, narrowed objectives went far beyond taking out the troops. extended to rem
they were willing to sacrifice their life just as i was for them, and in the end they proved it. michael team sacrificed their life, not just for me but for all of us in this room. some of the details that unfolded that day september 8, 2009 said we were running a mission in the valley. this is the only mission plan that took me out and replaced me with a sergeant named sargent johnson. now gunnery jay was a fitness guru that left to work out for the day and i can tell you right now i always hated it. so anyway, gunnery jay was going to take my spot and i still ask the question today. my assignment was to sit back and secure a position with all the vehicles and while my team entered the valley, which i was uncomfortable with that being in the united states marine corps to don't have much of an option but to follow orders. so the mission was to secure the town meeting because the village elders had come to us and said they were going to renounce themselves from the taliban. this is how we win the war for what it's worth. i believe the supporters of the taliban by that anything stopping th
and whether or not you can have a plastic bag or drink a soda. michael bloomberg a great example, he is banning the cuts in new york city. so that and we are talking about, that ideology on the left, the progressive ideology. swatter some of the mifsud are commonly held by today's progress of squawks i've got about five myths that we tend to focus on the first to because those are the big juicy ideas and the bad ideas one is the natural things are good and number two, on the natural things are bad. number three, unchecked science will destroy us. number four, science is only relative any way, and number five, science is on our side. okay. the first one we learn all about them there. we are going to talk mostly about the most famous progressive today, president barack obama and his resume when it comes to science, but just to give you an idea about why these are important, natural things are good. that's behind the organic food movement. the rejection of the organic the modified to. unnatural things are bad. that is the fear of chemical and bpa, the fear of chemistry and the things th
at large and michael duffy, executive editor for time magazine chronicle the relationship between the u.s. presidents in the president's club in side the world's most exclusive fraternity. political commentator kevin phillips recounts what he believes was the most important year of the american revolution which was 1775, a good year for revolutions. for an extended list of links to various publications, 2012 novel book selections visit the book tv website, booktv.org or our facebook page facebook.com/booktv . >> up next on book tv, richard wolff and david bersamian talk about our economic crisis and argue that it can be traced back to the 1970's when our economic system shifted from benefiting a vast majority of americans to one which mostly benefits only the very rich. this is about an hour-and-a-half. [applause] >> good to see you will hear. let's cut quickly to the chase. what is it and the dna of capitalism that makes this so unstable? >> since the beginning of economics as a discipline back in the days of adam smith and david mccarty who were the first to develop it as a comprehens
of smu and michael cox of smu are both here. and as you can see, smu is very important. in fact, maria and meaty who is here today also a chapter for the book and it's very important to the bush center. this is the bush institute's first book, the first of many as you will soon see. it is unusual that is published by by a major trade publisher, crown. as a result with a broad circulation. many of you here are supporters of the bush center and the thank all of you for making this book possible and in a real sense, this book is literally yours and you will get a copy of this book as you leave, a signed copy by president bush. we'll also take questions from the floor. he is comfortable here? i like you better sitting. i do, i do. so brand and company did the impossible, to kind of franco as we say in texas by 21 authors, i'm not talking about kevin or jason, but temperamental types. tell us a story about getting these people to write for us. >> sure, this past fall president bush noted the boat and said we had for a noble authors of the book. so i was in the audience and said to myself, i
economics. michael j. sandell, george w. bush, steve forbes all weigh in. and then at 9 p.m. craig whitney sits down with the former president of the brady campaign to prevent gun violence to discuss his book "living with guns: a liberal's case for the second amendment." watch these programs and more all weekend long on booktv. for a complete schedule, visit booktv.org. >>
-book. >> michael grunwald's book "the new new deal" which is about the economic stimulus, i found it very interesting and not the kind of stuff we were reading, seeing people discuss on tv, he writes for time magazine and is sort of a non-partisan and an appreciation of what the stimulus not only did for the economy but what it means for the environment, sort of a story that got lost in all the politics in washington. >> we have to have you comment as an employee of usa today on u.s. aid tomorrow. >> and the day after. the newspaper in september was 30 years old so a bunch of reporters were sent out to talk to people who could predict what the world would be like 30 years from now which would be what are we talking about? 20, 40, 2042. >> we talked about what it means for their industry and we put out a little tab and now that tab, broadsheet is now an e-book which i think you can buy for the grand total of $1.99. it hasn't really taken off yet. the short form somewhere in between a book and magazine, there are a lot of good ones, amazon has been doing them, they posted almost immediately
by the holy cross alumni michael harrington who found poverty hidden in appellation and in america's inner cities. shriver is accepted the challenge and got to work first of all research and the scope of the problem and its possible solutions. she found 30 million americans then living in poverty, and his agenda for them was and handouts employment through programs like the preschool head program, a dhaka court to retrain adults for in the dhaka the postindustrial economy and vista volunteers in service to america often described as a domestic peace corps. there were programs come stress and community leadership, global planning with federal funds, and there were legal services for the poor. in time, the war on poverty raised up resentment from some public officials who were challenged by the newly uncovered poor. meanwhile, slowly but inexorably, the war on vietnam drew the funding away from shriver's operation and offered a choice between war and asia and in poverty. johnson reluctantly took the military option. shriver opposed the reordering of priorities generating the observation in w
a few programs about economics. michael j. sandell, george w. bush, steve forbes all weigh in. craig whitney sits down with the former president of the brady campaign to prevent gun violation to discuss his book, "living with guns." watch these programs and more all weekend long on booktv. and for a complete schedule, visit booktv.org. >> booktv is here at the annual national press club authors' night, and joining us now is author arkansas run aruno has written a book called first cameraman. what's your association with the obama campaign? >> well, in 2008 on the obama campaign i was his personal videographer which is something i carried through to the first two and a half years of the white house. and this last cycle, actually, did not work on the campaign formally or at the white house, i worked in that new and strange, murky world of super pacs and pac and independent can expenditures. >> talk to us about the campaign in 2008. how'd you get hooked up with the president? >> well, there was an ad in craig's list -- no, that's actually not the case. it was right place, right time. a
, with the hobbit and when i was nine, rather peculiarly, i think i became michael moorcock. then for a couple of years, it was the first two books of "lord of the rings" because that's all they had in the school library. they have done this to individual book. they had the fellowship of the ring and the two towers. and when i get to the end of the two towers, i would go back and read the fellowship of the ring. when i was told, i went to school at english prize. they said you get a book. and i said i would like the return of the king. [applause] i wanted to find out how it ended. what is your advice for someone that wants to write and be published? right, finish things. make a really good unpublishable. send them to people who may publish them. when they come back from those people with nose saying that they can publish them, send them to somebody else. someone out there is drug enough were desperate enough to publish your story and then keep writing. don't go i finished my story, i saw the story. just write the next one. i notice a lot of your stories feature very started strong-willed woman
in the music industry and worked with michael jackson and prince and bob marley
] who have been wonderful to me for years and randy and michael, emily smith who designed the book and the marvelous photograph on the cover by my son, photographer steven ferry. and i am crazy, but thank you. [applause] >> the national book award for nonfiction will be presented by holton. holton is the mccauslin professor of american history at the universituniversit y of south carolina. his 2009 but, abigail adams, won the bancroft prize. he is the author of unruly americans and the origins of the constitution. a finalist for the george washington book prize and national book award. his first book ,-com,-com ma forced founders, indians, debtors slaves in the making of the american revolution in virginia, when the organization of american historians merle kirby award. i am honored to introduce holton. [applause] ♪ ♪ first i want to celebrate the wisdom and the congeniality of the fellow judges, who gave up a half half-year of their own writing to help find the five amazing books that we present to you tonight. they are brad gooch, linda gordon, susan orlean and judas fuel of
Search Results 0 to 18 of about 19

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